HOW AI CAN HELP INVENTORS AND ENTREPRENEURS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES?

A PLATFORM TO PROVIDE EXPERT SKILLS TO TECH STARTUPS EVERYWHERE IN THE WORLD

Few years ago, the co-founders of Teqmine published a study whether world’s poor countries are closing in or falling behind the rich ones in terms of technical inventions per population. It clearly showed, with the exception of China and India, that the world’s 2 billion poorest people, living in Africa, Asia and Latin America, were falling further behind the leading inventor countries, such as the US, Switzerland, and Finland.

One critical problem for inventors and entrepreneurs in disadvantaged regions is lack of access to technology and business experts, who could help to improve their early-stage ideas into more viable business proposals. With rich experience from several universities, global tech corporations, and startups, Teqmine AI has the potential to augment skills and expertise to people and organizations in disadvantages regions, and thereby provide additional boost for technology entrepreneurship that helps to close the gap between global poor and rich countries.

Toivanen H, Suominen A (2015) The Global Inventor Gap: Distribution and Equality of World-Wide Inventive Effort, 1990–2010. PLoS ONE 10(4): e0122098. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0122098

ABSTRACT

Applying distance-to-frontier analysis, we have used 2.9 million patents and population data to assess whether the relative capacity of world countries and major regions to create new knowledge and technology has become globally more equal or less equal between 1990 and 2010. We show with the Gini coefficient that the global distribution of inventors has become more equal between major countries and regions. However, this trend has been largely due to the improved performance of only two major countries, China and India. The worst performing regions, totalling a population of almost 2 billion, are actually falling behind. Our results suggest that substantial parts of the global population have fallen further behind countries at the global frontier in their ability to create new knowledge and inventions, and that the catch-up among the least developed and middle-income countries is highly uneven, prompting questions about the nature and future of the global knowledge economy.

Table 1. Global patent catch-up ratio for countries and major regions 1990–2010.

Fig 1. The cumulative share of fractional inventors and world population by 57 major countries and regions 1990–1995 and 2005–2010.
Countries and regions on the horizontal axis are ranked in descending order of count of fractional patents in 2005–2010. The vertical axis shows the cumulative share from all granted USPTO patents in 1990–1995 and 2005–2010. Countries are represented by the two letter abbreviations and Major Regions as explained above.

2018-09-07T09:14:41+00:00 September 7th, 2018|Innovation, Innovation Ecosystem, Inventions, News, Patent analysis|0 Comments